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Opinions expressed in this Blog do not necessarily represent views of the Bishop for OFE,  Abbot General for OFE, the OFE Board, the Abbey Board, the OFC Advisory Board, or any other members of OFE, OFES, COFE, Sanctification of Families Union of Saint Francis of Assisi, Theotokos Association of Catholic Priests,  and OFE Charters.
 

Athanasian Creed (Prayer)

  1. Whosoever will be saved, before all things it is necessary that he hold the Catholic faith;
  2. Which faith except every one do keep whole and undefiled, without doubt he shall perish everlastingly.
  3. And the Catholic faith is this: That we worship one God in Trinity, and Trinity in Unity;
  4. Neither confounding the persons nor dividing the substance.
  5. For there is one person of the Father, another of the Son, and another of the Holy Spirit.
  6. But the Godhead of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit is all one, the glory equal, the majesty coeternal.
  7. Such as the Father is, such is the Son, and such is the Holy Spirit.
  8. The Father uncreated, the Son uncreated, and the Holy Spirit uncreated.
  9. The Father incomprehensible, the Son incomprehensible, and the Holy Spirit incomprehensible.
  10. The Father eternal, the Son eternal, and the Holy Spirit eternal.
  11. And yet they are not three eternals but one eternal.
  12. As also there are not three uncreated nor three incomprehensible, but one uncreated and one incomprehensible.
  13. So likewise the Father is almighty, the Son almighty, and the Holy Spirit almighty.
  14. And yet they are not three almighties, but one almighty.
  15. So the Father is God, the Son is God, and the Holy Spirit is God;
  16. And yet they are not three Gods, but one God.
  17. So likewise the Father is Lord, the Son Lord, and the Holy Spirit Lord;
  18. And yet they are not three Lords but one Lord.
  19. For like as we are compelled by the Christian verity to acknowledge every Person by himself to be God and Lord;
  20. So are we forbidden by the Catholic religion to say; There are three Gods or three Lords.
  21. The Father is made of none, neither created nor begotten.
  22. The Son is of the Father alone; not made nor created, but begotten.

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Lectio Divina

By Abbot Father Michael Cuozzo+, OFE
 
“Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ.” (Saint Jerome, 340-420)
 
The Second Vatican Ecumenical Council (Concilium Oecumenicum Vaticanum Secundum 1962 – 1965) urged all Catholics to return to Scripture as a way of “supreme good of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord.” (Philippians 3:8)
 
“It is especially necessary that listening to the word of God should become a life-giving encounter, in the ancient and ever valid tradition of lectio divina, which draws from the biblical text the living Word which questions, directs and shapes our lives.” (Pope John Paul II Novo Millennio Ineunte, 39)
 
This brief article is a summary of the ancient practice of lectio divina. Lectio divina is Latin for Divine Reading. This style of prayer dates back to the early monastic tradition. Trappist monk Father Thomas Merton (1915 -1968) wrote, “It is understood that the personal prayer of the monk is embedded in a life of psalmody, liturgical celebration and the meditative reading of Scripture (lectio divina).”
 
How great it is to come into the depths of God’s Word. We are able to “taste and see that the Lord is good” (Psalm 34:9) and his words are “more desirable than gold, than a hoard of purest gold, sweeter also than honey or drippings from the comb.” (Psalm 19:11) Love, peace, and happiness are ours when we learn to “let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, as in all wisdom you teach and admonish one another, singing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs with gratitude in your hearts to God.(Colossians 3:16)
 
“Lectio Divina is Latin for divine reading, spiritual reading, or “holy reading,” and represents a method of prayer and scriptural reading intended to engender communion with the Triune God and to increase in the knowledge of God’s Word. It is a way of praying with Scripture that calls one to study, ponder, listen and, finally, pray from God’s Word.” We are urged to listen with our hearts because it was the Word of God that we are hearing.
 
Trappist monk Father Thomas Keating (1923), founder of the centering prayer movement explain what lectio divina is not. “It is not traditional Bible study, not reading the Scriptures for understanding and edification, and not praying the Scriptures (though praying the Scriptures can be a form of lectio divina when a word or phrase is taken from the Scriptures to focus on for the purpose of going into “God’s presence.””) Father Keating exclaims that lectio divina is a beginning into the more intense practices of centering prayer and contemplative prayer.

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Prayer for the Indwelling of the Spirit

Holy Spirit, powerful Consoler, sacred Bond of the Father and the Son, Hope of the afflicted, descend into my heart and establish in it Your loving dominion. Enkindle in my tepid soul the fire of Your Love so that I may be wholly subject to You. We believe that when you dwell in us, You also prepare a dwelling for the Father and the Son. Deign, therefore, to come to me, Consoler of abandoned souls, and Protector of the needy. Help the afflicted, strengthen the weak, and support the wavering. Come and purify me, Let no evil desire take possession of me. You love the humble and resist the proud. Come to me, Glory of the living, and Hope of the dying. Lead me by Your grace that I may always be pleasing to you. Amen.



The Jesus Prayer

By Abbot Father Michael Cuozzo+, OFE
 
The purpose of this brief article is merely to introduce the reader to the practice of the Jesus Prayer or the prayer of the heart.

Prayer is the center of our Christian being, the root of our experience of Jesus as the Risen Lord and Savior. Saint Paul insists the Christians of first century Thessalonica to “pray without ceasing” (1 Thessalonians 5:17).  And in his letter to Rome, the Apostle teaches the Christian community there to “be constant in prayer” (Romans 12:12).  He not only advices unceasing prayer of the Christians in his care, but does it himself. “We constantly thank God for you” (1 Thessalonians. 2:13) he pens in his letter to the Thessalonian community; and he comforts Timothy, his “true child in the faith” (1Timothy 1:2) with the words: “Always I remember you in my prayers” (2 Timothy 1:3).

Prayer is all of life. Prayer is as essential to our life as breathing. To a certain extent, pray means to think and live our entire life in the Presence of God. A Russian and French theologian, writer, and professor of theology Paul Evdokimov has observed: “Our whole life, every act and gesture, even a smile must become a hymn or adoration, an offering, a prayer. We must become prayer-prayer incarnate.” This is what Saint Paul means when he writes to the Corinthians that “whatever you do, do it for the glory of God” (1 Corinthians 10:31).

In order to enter more deeply into the life of prayer, to live our entire life in the Presence of God, and to come to grips with Saint Paul’s challenge to pray unceasingly, the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, and Eastern Catholic churches offers the Jesus Prayer, which is sometimes called the prayer of the heart.The anonymous author of The Way of the Pilgrim reports that the Jesus Prayer writes: “When I prayed in my heart, everything around me seemed delightful and marvelous. The trees, the grass, the birds, the air, the light seemed to be telling me that they existed for man’s sake, that they witnessed to the love of God for man, that all things prayed to God and sang his praise.”

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